FAQ’s

Frequently Asked Question's

Below is the list of some Frequently Asked Question’s

Cardiology

Smoking damages the lining of the blood vessels, increases blood clotting and promotes coronary artery spasms. Also, nicotine accelerates the heart rate and raises blood pressure.

If you are able to stop smoking, your risk of heart attack and stroke decreases within a few weeks. After about two years, your risk goes down to the same as a nonsmoker.

Stress causes your heart rate to speed up and your blood pressure to rise. Chronic stress creates an environment where your body is in a constant state of “fight or flight,” which can strain your heart.

There is an increase in risk of heart attack if you have a parent or sibling who has had a heart attack or stroke, especially before the age of 45. You should maintain a healthy lifestyle and have your cholesterol and blood pressure checked regularly.

Being overweight does increase your risk of heart disease.

general-medicine-doctor

General Medicine

Excellent question. To make a long story short: A serving of alcohol is typically not very high in calories, BUT it is metabolized very differently than our food (90 percent in the liver), which can make weight loss tricky. For example, a light beer is roughly 100 calories and so is a handful of nuts. In terms of calories, this is not much at all, but in terms of metabolism, they vary significantly, partly because you have fiber, protein, and fat in the nut and virtually none of these in beer.

This is why we can’t say a calorie equals a calorie. Think of it this way, an empty calorie food or drink is something you can remove from the diet but still maintain optimal physiological function. Do our bodies need alcohol to survive? No. Candy? No. Soda? No. These are empty calories because they don’t have a purpose. Do we need lean protein to survive? Yes. Fresh produce? Yes. You get the idea…

The scientific evidence on the role of diet in autoimmune diseases such as lupus is just becoming available. I am a believer that a plant-based diet is helpful in promoting overall health and decreasing the chemicals that cause inflammation. I advocate a plant-based diet along with a very low-fat diet. You have to recall that French fries are vegan but they are not exactly healthy. I think that exercise and healthy diet are extremely important for everyone, but more so for those with autoimmune diseases.

There are genetic factors. There are some people that are born with certain genes that predispose them to stroke. One such condition would be CADASIL (cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy). If you are interested, I am sure you can learn more about this condition from the Web. Some people are born with genetic conditions that predispose them to clotting. This in turn may increase their stroke risk. Finally, if you have a strong family history of high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol or any of the major modifiable risk factors for stroke, you may also be at higher risk because of this. However, these particular conditions are very much treatable and you certainly can do something about them to lower your risk.

Albuterol is usually the primary “rescue” or short-term medicine that is used to help acute asthma symptoms, such as coughing or wheezing. When a patient needs to use albuterol to relieve daytime symptoms more than twice per week, however, it usually reflects the need to use daily “controller” or anti-inflammatory medications. Many people are concerned about possible side effects of inhaled steroids, which are the largest group of “controller” medications available. When used in low- to medium-doses, however, inhaled steroids are very safe, even used on a daily basis for years. They are much safer than either multiple courses of oral steroids OR uncontrolled/undertreated asthma symptoms.

Dental Services

Exposure to all sources of radiation — including the sun, minerals in the soil, appliances in your home, and dental X-rays — can damage the body’s tissues and cells and can lead to the development of cancer in some instances. Fortunately, the dose of radiation you are exposed to during the taking of X-rays is extremely small

Tooth decay and periodontal disease are the most common causes of tooth loss. Tooth decay takes place when most of the tooth’s mineral makeup has been dissolved away and a hole (cavity) has formed. While tooth decay primarily affects children, periodontal disease, or gum disease, affects mostly adults. Periodontal disease is an infection of the gums caused by the buildup of plaque, and its earliest stage is known as gingivitis.

Most dental professionals recommend that you brush your teeth at least twice a day. Brushing after every meal (and flossing at least once a day) is also a good way to maintain dental health.

A child should have his first dental appointment no later than his third birthday. Many dentists recommend a child have his first appointment when his first tooth comes in.

Tobacco (cigarettes, pipes, cigars, chewing tobacco, and snuff) is the most common cause of oral cancer. Combining tobacco use with heavy drinking can also foster the development of oral cancer. Bad hygiene, prolonged irritation of the oral cavity, and extended exposure to strong sunlight on the lips are among other causes of the disease. Many dentists believe vitamins A and E can help prevent the acquisition of oral cancer.

Early symptoms of oral cancer include: a sore on the lip, in the mouth, or in the throat that does not heal; a lump on the lip, in the mouth, or in the throat; a red or white patch found anywhere in the mouth; unusual pain or bleeding in the mouth; swelling of the mouth; and any difficulty or discomfort felt in chewing or swallowing.

Thumb and pacifier sucking habits will generally only become a problem if they go on for a very long period of time. Most children stop these habits on their own, but if they are still sucking their thumbs or fingers past the age of three, a mouth appliance may be recommended by your pediatric dentist.

Sealants work by filling in the crevasses on the chewing surfaces of the teeth. This shuts out food particles that could get caught in the teeth, causing cavities. The application is fast and comfortable and can effectively protect teeth for many years.

Parents should take their children to the dentist regularly, beginning with the eruption of the first tooth. Then, the dentist can recommend a specific program of brushing, flossing, and other treatments for parents to supervise and teach to their children. These home treatments, when added to regular dental visits and a balanced diet, will help give your child a lifetime of healthy habits.